Tag: seaweed

Seaweed powder

lotus export=seaweed

ASCOPHYLLUM NODUSUM

SEAWEED EXTRACT POWDER

(100% Organic & Soluble)

The extracts of selected fresh seaweed (algae), Ascophyllum nodosum, which are natural, non-toxic, harmless and non-polluting, and rich in minor elements and natural growth hormones. It is a designated fertilizer for organic and non-polluting farming. Effect It is suitable for all crops and applications including field crops, potting soil, vegetable and flower gardens, orchards and turf grass. Promotes balanced growth of crops, boosts the capacity of immunity and resistance, improves crop quality and increase yield.

    • Greater nutritional value: Rapidly complement the nutrients, im­prove the quality of product.
    • Better root systems: Promoting the development of roots
    • Healthier foliage and fruit appearance: Thicken, enlarge and balance the leaf growth, supply well-balanced crop nutrients, stimulating cell division, improve the fruit set, improve blossom and fruit set.
    • Greater resistance to disease and pests: Containing antitoxins to fend off bacteria and viruses, and to repel insects. Helps plants to endure environmental stress
    • Improved seed germination: Promoting the development of shoots.
    • Natural soil conditioner: balance the fecundity of soil andrestore the soil conditions.
    • As formulation: seaweed extract can be used not only on crops, but also to formulate types of fertilizers. A little addition of seaweed extract on common fertilizer will height the quality greatly.

Technique: Our product be done base on biological & chemical processed and be extracted by Fermentation Process.

Application of Seaweed Extract Powder After being dissolved in neutral water by stirring. Seaweed extract can be applied for foliage spray and with irrigation water. It suits to irrigation system. After being diluted, it may be applied by mixing with farm chemicals, but please note that you can’t add acidic matter,the matter including bivalent metal ion and over bivalent, because these matters will react with our product.

Used of methods Irrigation, dosage: 10-15kgs/hectare total one farming season (or root irrigation rate is 1:1200-1500), and we recommend to apply 3-4 times every farming season according to the farm season. Root Irrigation methods include spray irrigation, drip irrigation, and flow irrigation.

Seed-soaking It also can be used to soak crop seed be­fore planting, suitable for the pre-germination of seeds, dilution rate is 1:2000-4000. And the time of soak is determined according to the thickness of seed skin. In general, it should be soaked 5-8h. It can reduce the mortality rate, using it for several minutes before transplanting shrubs, plants or trees.

Mixing Compatibility Soluble seaweed extract powder/flake is compatiblewith most, but not all, pesticides, growth regulators and micronutrients with regards to physical tank mixing and biologi­cal effects on the crop. However, we cannot accept any liability for any loss or damage as not all pesticides have been tested and because the efficacy of any mix will depend on, among other factors, the pesticide concerned, crop conditions, growth stage, weather, and volumes of water used.

suckericide, sucker controller, tobacco suckericide, suckericide, tobacco plant growth, improves quality of tobacco 8 Aug

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suckericide_tobacco

suckericide

In the news from : LOTUS EXPORT.

We at Lotus Export manufacturer, export & supply tobacco suckericide, suckericide, suckericides, tobacco sucker control, tobacco sucker & tobacco leaf weight and quality enhancer

AXE-11 liquid de-suckering agent is a contact type suckericide made from natural fattly

alcohols to control suckers in tobacco crops. Application of AXE-11 liquid suckericide

improves quality and quantity of tobacco crop. On application of AXE-11 liquid suckericide

labour cost is decreased and yield of tobacco increases by 25% – 35%.

AXE-11 will not leave any residues on the crop.

 

Note : 
Topping stage is of importance for yield production in tobacco to improve plant growth, leaf size development, improved quantity and quality. Moreover, application of AXE – 11 suckericide in early button stage can control suckers better than flowering stage.

How to apply :

1 litre AXE-11 liquid de-suckering agent should be mixed with 20 litres water (1:20) Mix

thoroughly to form uniform mixture.

Apply the solution using an applicator after topping from top to bottom in clear weather

between 10.00am to 4.00pm

AXE-11 liquid de-suckering agent shall be applied on requirement.

 

Packing Available in 2.5 litre HDPE jerry can

 

suckericide

sucker

tobacco suckericide

 


Potassium deficiency

Potassium deficiency

Potassium (K) is one of the essential nutrients and is taken up in significant amounts by crops. Potassium is vital to photosynthesis, protein synthesis and many other functions in plants. It’s classified as a macronutrient, as are nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Plants take up K in its ionic form (K+).

While potassium (K) doesn’t constitute any plant structures or compounds, it plays a part in many important regulatory roles in the plant. It’s essential in nearly all processes needed to sustain plant growth and reproduction, including:

  • photosynthesis
  • translocation of photosynthates
  • plant respiration
  • protein synthesis
  • control of ionic balance
  • breakdown of carbohydrates, which provides energy for plant growth
  • regulation of plant stomata and water use
  • activation of plant enzymes
  • disease resistance and recovery
  • turgor
  • stress tolerance, including extreme weather conditions

Perhaps K’s most important function in the plant is that it can activate at least 80 enzymes that regulate the rates of major plant growth reactions. K also influences water-use efficiency. The process of opening and closing of plant leaf pores, called stomates, is regulated by K concentration in the guard cells, which surround the stomates. When stomates open, large quantities of K move from the surrounding cells into the guard cells. As K moves out of the guard cells into surrounding cells, stomates close, therefore K plays a key role in the process plants use to conserve water. Unlike nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), the other primary nutrients, K doesn’t form organic compounds in the plant. Its primary function is related to ionic strength of solutions inside plant cells. Potassium plays a key part in increasing yields and controlling disease because it improves a crop’s winter hardiness. It allows crops to get a quicker start in the spring and increases vigor so growth can continue throughout the growing season. Even though the period of K uptake varies with different plants, it’s still vital to maintain adequate K fertility levels in the soil because soil K doesn’t move much, except in sand or organic soils. Unlike N and some other nutrients, K tends to remain where fertilization puts it. When it does move, it’s mainly by diffusion and is always slow. Plants generally absorb the majority of their K at an earlier growth stage than they do N and P. Experiments on K uptake by corn have shown that 70 to 80 percent can absorb by silking time, and 100 percent at three to four weeks after silking. K translocation from the leaves and stems to the grain occurs in much smaller amounts than for P and N. The grain formation period is apparently not a critical one for the supply and uptake of K. Plants deficient in K don’t grow as robustly and are less resistant to drought, excess water, and high and low temperatures. They’re also more vulnerable to pests, diseases and nematode attacks. Potassium is also known as the “quality nutrient” because of its important effects on factors such as size, shape, color, taste, shelf life, fiber quality and other qualitative measurements. Potassium-deficiency symptoms show up in many ways. One of the most common K hunger signs is scorching or firing along leaf margins. Firing first appears on older leaves in most plants, especially grasses. Newer leaves will show hunger signs first on certain plants and under certain conditions. In addition to growing slowly, K-deficient plants’ root systems develop poorly and have weak stalks. Lodging is also common.   Symptoms of deficiency can vary across crop species, but similarities exist for how nutrient insufficiency impacts plant tissue color and appearance. Nutrient deficiencies are commonly associated with the physical location on the plant
(i.e., whether the symptoms are primarily observed on older versus newly formed plant tissue), but these symptoms can spread as the severity of the deficiency progresses.

Phosphorus deficiency

Phosphorus deficiency

One of three primary nutrients, phosphorus (P) is essential for plant growth. No other nutrient can be substituted for P — a plant must access it to complete its normal production cycle.

Phosphorus is a vital component of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the “energy unit” of plants. ATP forms during photosynthesis, has P in its structure, and processes from the beginning of seedling growth through to the formation of grain and maturity.

The general health and vigor of all plants requires P. Some specific growth factors associated with P include stimulated root development, increased stalk and stem strength, improved flower formation and seed production, more uniform and earlier crop maturity, increased nitrogen (N)-fixing capacity of legumes, improvements in crop quality, and increased resistance to plant diseases.

Phosphorus deficiency is more difficult to diagnose than a deficiency of N or potassium (K). Crops usually display no obvious symptoms of P deficiency other than a general stunting of the plant during early growth, and by the time a visual deficiency is recognized, it may be too late to correct in annual crops.

Some crops, such as corn, tend to show an abnormal discoloration when P is deficient. The plants are usually dark bluish-green in color, with leaves and stem becoming purplish. The genetic makeup of the plant influences the degree of purple, and some hybrids show much greater discoloration than others. The purplish color results from the accumulation of sugars, which favors the synthesis of anthocyanin (a purplish pigment) that occurs in the leaves of the plant.

Phosphorus is highly mobile in plants and, when deficient, may translocate from old plant tissue to young, actively growing areas. Consequently, early vegetative responses to P are often observed. As a plant matures, P translocates into the fruiting areas of the plant, where the formation of seeds and fruit requires high energy. Phosphorus deficiencies late in the growing season affect both seed development and normal crop maturity. The percentage of the total amount of each nutrient taken up is higher for P late in the growing season than for either N or K.

 

Symptoms of deficiency can vary across crop species, but similarities exist for how nutrient insufficiency impacts plant tissue color and appearance. Nutrient deficiencies are commonly associated with the physical location on the plant
(i.e., whether the symptoms are primarily observed on older versus newly formed plant tissue), but these symptoms can spread as the severity of the deficiency progresses.

 

 

 

 

 

Nitrogen deficiency

Nitrogen deficiency

Nitrogen (N) is essential for plant growth and is part of every living cell. It plays many roles in plants and is necessary for chlorophyll synthesis. Plants take up most of their N as the ammonium (NH4+) or nitrate (No3-) ion. Some direct absorption of urea can occur through the leaves, and small amounts of N are obtained from materials such as water-soluble amino acids.

Nitrogen (N) surrounds all plants in our atmosphere. In fact, every acre of the Earth’s surface is covered by thousands of pounds of this essential nutrient, but because atmospheric gaseous N presents itself as almost inert nitrogen (N2) molecules, this N isn’t directly available to the plants that need it to grow, develop and reproduce.Despite its identity as one of the most abundant elements on Earth, deficient N is probably the most common nutritional problem affecting plants worldwide.

Healthy plants often contain 3 to 4 percent N in their above-ground tissues. These are much higher concentrations than those of any other nutrient except carbon, hydrogen and oxygen – nutrients not of soil fertility management concern in most situations. Nitrogen is an important component of many important structural, genetic and metabolic compounds in plant cells. It’s a major element in chlorophyll, the compound by which plants use sunlight energy to produce sugars from water and carbon dioxide, or, in other words, photosynthesis.

Nitrogen is also a major component of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Some proteins act as structural units in plant cells, while others act as enzymes, making possible many of the biochemical reactions on which life is based. Nitrogen appears in energy-transfer compounds, such as ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which allows cells to conserve and use the energy released in metabolism. Finally, N is a significant component of nucleic acids such as DNA, the genetic material that allows cells (and eventually whole plants) to grow and reproduce. With the exception of photosynthesis, N plays the same roles in animals, too. Without N, there would be no life as we know it.

Adequate N produces a dark green color in the leaves, caused by high concentration of chlorophyll. Nitrogen deficiency results in chlorosis (a yellowing) of the leaves because of the declining chlorophyll. This yellowing starts first on oldest leaves, then develops on younger ones as the deficiency becomes more severe. Slow growth and stunted plants are also indicators of N deficiency. Small grains and other grass-type plants tiller less when N is in short supply.

Symptoms of deficiency can vary across crop species, but similarities exist for how nutrient insufficiency impacts plant tissue color and appearance. Nutrient deficiencies are commonly associated with the physical location on the plant
(i.e., whether the symptoms are primarily observed on older versus newly formed plant tissue), but these symptoms can spread as the severity of the deficiency progresses.

Nutrient Deficiencies in Plants

Nutrient Deficiencies in Plants

Sometimes plants look unhealthy and we assume they have been attacked by pests. This could however be early signs of nutrient deficiency.

If plants do not receive adequate proportion of essential minerals or they fail to thrive despite of proper growing conditions it signifies they are suffering from malnutrition. There are various minerals required for proper growth and health of a plant. Excess of these nutrients can be harmful as well and may show toxicity symptoms. This implies you need to be very careful while feeding plants with essential minerals and nutrients, as both excess and lack of them can be a cause of adverse effects.

Plant Nutrient Deficiency

Nutrients are divided in 2 categories – micronutrients and macronutrients. Minerals required in small traces are called micronutrients, while those required in large amounts are termed as macronutrients. Following tables give information about various nutrients, their deficiency & toxicity symptoms, and treatment for respective nutrient deficiency:

FOR MICRONUTRIENTS:

NUTRIENT AND FUNCTIONDEFICIENCY SYMPTOMSTOXICITY SYMPTOMSTREATMENT FOR DEFICIENCY
BORON: stimulates cell wall and flower formation, cell division and pollination; enables sugar transportation.Rotting of roots; death of growing points; uneven ripening; young leaves turn red, brown or scorched; death of buds.Margins and leaf tips will turn brown and die.Apply household borax. This should be done at a rate of 1 tablespoon of borax to 12 quarts of water.
IRON: necessary for legume nitrogen fixation; regulates respiration of plant cells; helps in chlorophyll formation; used for enzymatic activity.Necrotic spots; discoloring of leaves; young leaves develop chlorosis; yellowing of veins in young leaves; poor colored fruits.Bronzing of leaves with brown spots.Add chelated iron, bone meal, iron sulfate or inorganic amendments.
COPPER: regulates cell wall construction, cell growth and division; stimulate enzymatic activity required for nitrogen and carbohydrate metabolism.Brown area near tips of a leaf; small leaves with necrotic spots; root growth stops; leaves are dark green with stunted plants.Root growth stops; an iron deficiencymay be induced.Apply calcium rich fertilizers like calcium sulfate, foliar application of copper; treatment of seeds with copper compounds.
MANGANESE: stimulate enzymatic activity; promote energy cycle; helps in chloroplast production; enhances root growth and fruit development.Leaves show scorching and have reduced width; total yellowing of young leaves or between leaf veins.Shows iron deficiency symptoms; brown spots on older leaves; blotchy leaf tissue.Add manganese sulfate inorganic amendments.
MOLYBDENUM: helps innitrogen fixation and in reducing absorbed nitrates into ammonia; required for protein synthesis and enhances photosynthesis.Problem in brassica family like cauliflower showing elongated twisted leaves; head can fail to form; restricted flower formationNot so common. Excess intake will appear as copper/iron deficiency.Add lime before sowing seeds.
ZINC: used in synthesis of chlorophyll; stimulates enzymatic activity; essential for hormone balance especially auxin.New leaves are small and yellow; shoots may show resetting followed by dieback; short internodes; missing leaf blades; terminal leaves may be rosetted.Very rare. Shows signs of iron deficiency.Use aged organic manure, acidity generating fertilizers and organic compounds like zinc chelate etc.

FOR MACRONUTRIENTS:

NUTRIENT AND FUNCTIONDEFICIENCY SYMPTOMSTOXICITY SYMPTOMSTREATMENT FOR DEFICIENCY
NITROGEN: responsible for production of nucleic acids and proteins to carry out reproduction and cell division. Major part of chlorophyll.Yellowing of older leaves; new leaves are smaller in size; branching is reduced; plants mature early and get stuntedPlants become dark green in color and are susceptible to lodging; plants are prone to drought stress; lack of fruit set; poor secondary shoot development.Short term: spray with fish emulsion; apply high nitrogen fertilizers.Long term: mulching with organic matter; apply aged compost; use soybean meal and manure once in spring.
PHOSPHOROUS: required for cell division, sugar and starch formation, and energy transfer. Strengthen stems; responsible for flowering and fruiting; helps plants to act as resistant to diseases and pests.Plant growth slows down; old leaves turn dark green or reddish – purple; leaf tips look burnt; thin stemsShows visual deficiency of nutrients like zinc, iron and manganese.Short term: spray with fish emulsion; apply aged compost and apply phosphorous rich fertilizers like super phosphate or bone meal.Long term: mix rock phosphate in soil.
CALCIUM: responsible for cell wall construction, cell growth, leaf and root development.New leaves are irregularly shaped or distorted; blossom-end rot in tomatoes; brown color of growing leaves and roots; tip burn in some plants like cabbage; premature shedding of fruits; leaves may stick togetherHigh calcium will cause precipitation of many micro-nutrients as a result they remain unavailable to plant; plant may showmagnesium deficiency symptoms.Add organic matter, agricultural lime to acidic soils.
POTASSIUM: responsible for activation of enzymes, stomata opening, root development, formation of sugar, electrolyte balance and transpiration. Also increases resistance of plants to diseases.Sick looking plants; curling of leaves; old leaves turn yellow and look scorched; undersized fruits; leaves may turn brown; weak branches and stems; poor fruiting and floweringCause nitrogen deficiency in plants; plants exhibitmagnesium and calcium deficiencysymptoms.Short term: spray with fish emulsion; use fertilizers like sulphate of potash, tomato feed.Long term: apply seawmeed, granite dust, manure or greensand.Hardwood ashes can be applied anytime.
MAGNESIUM: helps in production of ATP and synthesis of chlorophyll. Responsible for enzymatic actions.Older leaves turn yellow while leaf veins remain green; slow growth; leaf tip gets twisted.Shows sign of calcium orpotassium deficiency; necrotic spots in old leaves; veins in older leaves may turn brownApply foliar magnesium.
SULFUR: acts as enzyme activator and coenzyme; responsible for root growth.Shoots are stunted; new leaves are yellow in color; roots and stems appear small.Premature ageing.Add sulfur or potassium sulfate.

Above given treatments will help you to maintain a healthy crops, blooming fields, bringing you pride and peace.

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