Tag: amino acid

Welcome to Lotus Export

Lotus Export offers Fertilisers, Tobacco Suckericides, Banana Suckericide, Tobacco Sucker Control, Organic Fertilizers, Humic Acid, Amino Acid, Potassium Humate, Chelated Micronutrients, Brossinolides, Natca, Gibbrellic, Neem Oil, Neem Cake, Neem Pellets, Neem Powder, Azadirachtin, Chemicals, Plastic Masterbatches.

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Gibbrellic Acid

Gibbrellic Acid GA3 manufacturers & exporters – Lotus Export

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Gibberellic Acid  GA3

Gibberellic acid is actually a group of related substances called gibberellins discovered as a metabolic byproduct of the fungus Gibberella fujikuroi, which causes the stems of growing plants or crops to elongate rapidly.

Gibberellic acid (GA3) is a very potent hormone whose natural occurrence in plants controls their development. Since GA3 regulates growth, applications of very low concentrations can have a profound effect. Timing is critical: too much GA3 may have an opposite effect from that desired; too little may require the plant to be repeatedly treated to sustain desired levels of GA3.

Benefits of Gibberellic Acid

  1. Overcoming dormancy. Treatment with high concentrations of GA3 is effective in overcoming dormancy and causing rapid germination of seed. Concentrations of about 2 ppm can cause tubers to sprout earlier.
  2. Premature flowering. If a plant is sufficiently developed, premature flowering may be induced by direct application of GA3 to young plants. This action is not sustained and treatment may have to be repeated. Formation of male flowers is generally promoted by concentrations of 10 to 200 ppm., female flowers by concentrations of 200 to 300 ppm. Concentrations of more than 600 ppm markedly suppresses initiation of both male and female flowers.
  3. Increased fruit set. When there is difficulty with fruit set because of incomplete pollination, GA3 may be effectively used to increase fruit set. The resulting fruit maybe partially or entirely seedless. GA3 has increased the total yield in greenhouse tomato crops both as a result of increased fruit set and more rapid growth of the fruit.
  4. Pollination within self-incompatible clones and between closely related species may sometimes be forced by the application of GA3 and cytokinin to the blooms at the time of hand pollination.
  5. Increased growth. GA3 applied near the terminal bud of trees may increase the rate of growth by stimulating more or less constant growth during the season. In a field experiment, the GA3 was applied as a 1% paste in a band around the terminal bud of trees. Treatment was repeated three times during the summer. Walnut tee growth was 8.5 ft. for treated trees, 1.5 ft. for untreated trees.
  6. Frost protection. Spraying fruit trees at full-blossom or when the blossoms begin to wither can offset the detrimental effects of frost.
  7. Root formation. GA3 inhibits the formation of roots in cuttings.

 

Banana Sucker control

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Banana Suckericide, Side Shoots remover, Sucker Controller

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MUSA-8 de-suckering agent offered by us is an exclusive range of Banana Suckericide. Our range has contact type suckericide, which is made from natural fatty alcohols to eliminate suckers arising from the base of banana plants. Application of MUSA-8 suckericide eliminates banana base suckers within 5-10 days and improves quality and quantity of banana fruit.

 

On application of MUSA-8 suckericide labour cost is decreased and development of banana increases gradually. Yield of banana fruit increases by 25% – 35%

How to Apply

Keeping too many sucking plants will reduce yields. It is advisable to remove all suckers once the desired followers have been selected.
Firstly cut the unwanted suckers / side shoots near the mother plant 4” above the field level horizontally. After 30 minutes pierce the central part of the sucker with a knife and remove it gently to hold just 2 drops of MUSA-8 suckericide at the top. The treated suckers turns into brown/black in colour and in a few days suckers will be no more in existence.
 

Packing Available : 1 Litre, 5 Litres, 50 Litres & 200 Litres

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Amino Acids

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Amino Acid- Protein Hydrolysate : It is widely used as base fertilizer in all kinds of agricultural crops. It contains seventeen free L-amino acids including 6 kinds of necessary amino acids such as L-Threonine, L-Valine,L-Methionine, L-Isoleucine, L-Pheinylalanine and L-Lysine,which are 15% of total amino acids;   6% of total are semi necessary amino acids(e. G. L-Arginine and L-Histidine). The content of total amino acids is about 40% to 80% depend on purity.   Advantage of Amino Acids in Agriculture:-

  • Improve absorption through the roots
  • Increase crop resistance to adverse condition ( drought, frost, salinity, hail, disease)
  • Improve flavour, colour, firmness and preservation of fruit
  • Help the plant to produce its own protein easier, saving energy required to produce amino acids to benefit formation of the proteins and plant cells.

Protein Hydrolysate (Amino Acid mixture) are the basic building blocks of living cells. Proteins are formed by sequence of amino acids. The amino acids are organic substances consisting of an asymmetric carbon to which are bounded an amino group(-NH2),a carboxylic group (-COOH) & two characteristics radicals of each amino acid (R & R”) Although there are number of amino acids from the agricultural point of view alpha amino acids are of great interest. Plants synthesize amino acids from primary elements, carbon & oxygen obtained from atmosphere & hydrogen from water in the soil, forming carbon hydrates by means of photosynthesis and combining it with the nitrogen which plants obtain from soil thus producing amino acids. Plants absorb nitrogen through its roots in the form of nitrate small percentage in the form of ammonia which become nitrite & then ammonia.   The ammonia reacts with biochemical cellular compounds giving rise to glutamic acid & aspartic acid. Amino acids which through transmission gives rise to the other amino acids .By means of activating enzymes specific to each amino acid the process of protein synthesis begins in the cellular protoplasm. The process of synthesis of amino acids from nitrate obtained from the soil requires a great amount of energy. If there is a deficiency of nitrogen in the soil due to poor nitrification or if the conditions of stress are present such as drought, frost, pest attack it makes the process difficult causing serious prejudicial effect on the yield. This can be allivated by applying Amino Acids directly to cells i.e. through foliar spraying. Our Amino Acid Mixture is available in powder as well as liquid form & used in number of agricultural formulation like Zyme, Biostim, Amino acid base Micro nutrient Chelates, & other plant growth promoter (PGR) formulations as a organic source of nitrogen.  

Mineral – Amino Acid Complex: – like Zn, Mn, Fe, Cu, Mg,& B & in Combination For Spray & Soil Application.   The amino acids (Protein) provide organic nitrogen along with minerals in complex form which is actively absorb & utilized by plant. Plants absorb the amino acids (Hydrolysed Protein) along with mineral ions quickly & easily. Digested protein s has a chelating effect on minerals. When applied together with minerals, the absorption and transportation of minerals inside the plant is easier. This effect is due to the chelating action and to the effect of cell membrane permeability. L – Glycine & L – Glutamic acid are known to be very effective chelating agents. This is present in Organic Mineral Amino Acid complex  formulation. The Hydrolysed Protein plays active role in respiratory function. The Hydrolysed Protein Mineral Complex contain all essential amino acids & minerals, which are precursors of Phytohormones & other growth substances & accelerate the Metabolic, & Physiological activity of plant. The application of Protein, Metal Complex before, during and after the stress conditions supplies the plants with Amino Acids & Minerals which are directly related to stress physiology and thus has a preventing and recovering effect. The Hydrolysed Protein – Mineral Complex helps to boost up energy metabolism in the plant.

Benefits: Mineral – Amino Acid Complex is a readymade & easily available source of nutrition. It helps in pollination & fruit formation. Increases chlorophyll concentration & boosts the photosynthesis activity. It has a high percentage of biological value & nutritive value. No inorganic nitrogen is present. Excess dose is non-toxic as it is organic source. The rate of absorption of these Complexes of Amino Acids is found to be many times faster than ordinary salts of Minerals. These Complexes also meet amino acid requirements of plant. It is available in combination (Amino Acid with all mineral) as well as individual complex in bulk.

Area of application other than Agriculture: –   As Mentioned above and same is applicable to all other uses i.e. amino acid are building blocks of the all leaving substances, hence it can be widely use in the nutritional supplements in formulation of  Animal feed , aqua feed , Food preparation for human body  and as food for bacteria in fermentation industries.   Our process of Producing amino acid is enzyme hydrolysis, which only produces L-amino acids , which are having following merits over other process.

AMINO ACIDS  OBTAINED BY ENZYME HYDROLYSIS.
1CONSISTS OF TWENTY AMINO ACIDS.
2ALL AMINO ACIDS ARE IN L FORM (NATURAL FORM) & ARE ABSORBED QUICKLY & EASILY BY PLANTS.
3NO CYCLIZATION OF GLUTAMINE WHICH IS IMPORTANT FOR ENERGY METABOLISM.
4NO DESTRUCTION OF ASPARGINE WHICH HAS ACTIVE ROLE IN RESPIRATORY FUNCTION.
5TRYPTOPHAN WHICH IS STARTING MATERIAL FOR SYNTHESIS OF AUXIN IS AVAILABLE IN L FORM.
6SERINE & THREONINE ARE FREE & IN L FORM.
7ASPARTIC ACID & GLUTAMIC ACID WHICH ARE VERY IMPORTANT AMINO ACIDS ARE AVAILABLE IN FREE L FORM FOR EASY ABSORPTION.
8AMIDE NITROGEN IS NOT FORMED.
Amino Acid TechnicalPacking available
Amino Acid Powder – 90% 1Kg, 5Kg, 25Kg Papper bag
Amino Acid Powder – 80% 1Kg, 5Kg, 25Kg Papper bag
Amino Acid Powder – 60% 1Kg, 5Kg, 25Kg Papper bag
Amino Acid Liquid  – 40%500ml, 1Litre, 200Kg.
Amino Acid Liquid  – 30%500ml, 1Litre, 200Kg.
Amino Acid Liquid  – 20%500ml, 1Litre, 200Kg.

 

Phosphorus deficiency

Phosphorus deficiency

One of three primary nutrients, phosphorus (P) is essential for plant growth. No other nutrient can be substituted for P — a plant must access it to complete its normal production cycle.

Phosphorus is a vital component of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the “energy unit” of plants. ATP forms during photosynthesis, has P in its structure, and processes from the beginning of seedling growth through to the formation of grain and maturity.

The general health and vigor of all plants requires P. Some specific growth factors associated with P include stimulated root development, increased stalk and stem strength, improved flower formation and seed production, more uniform and earlier crop maturity, increased nitrogen (N)-fixing capacity of legumes, improvements in crop quality, and increased resistance to plant diseases.

Phosphorus deficiency is more difficult to diagnose than a deficiency of N or potassium (K). Crops usually display no obvious symptoms of P deficiency other than a general stunting of the plant during early growth, and by the time a visual deficiency is recognized, it may be too late to correct in annual crops.

Some crops, such as corn, tend to show an abnormal discoloration when P is deficient. The plants are usually dark bluish-green in color, with leaves and stem becoming purplish. The genetic makeup of the plant influences the degree of purple, and some hybrids show much greater discoloration than others. The purplish color results from the accumulation of sugars, which favors the synthesis of anthocyanin (a purplish pigment) that occurs in the leaves of the plant.

Phosphorus is highly mobile in plants and, when deficient, may translocate from old plant tissue to young, actively growing areas. Consequently, early vegetative responses to P are often observed. As a plant matures, P translocates into the fruiting areas of the plant, where the formation of seeds and fruit requires high energy. Phosphorus deficiencies late in the growing season affect both seed development and normal crop maturity. The percentage of the total amount of each nutrient taken up is higher for P late in the growing season than for either N or K.

 

Symptoms of deficiency can vary across crop species, but similarities exist for how nutrient insufficiency impacts plant tissue color and appearance. Nutrient deficiencies are commonly associated with the physical location on the plant
(i.e., whether the symptoms are primarily observed on older versus newly formed plant tissue), but these symptoms can spread as the severity of the deficiency progresses.

 

 

 

 

 

Oxygen

Oxygen

Oxygen (O) is responsible for cellular respiration in plants. Plants acquire O by breaking down carbon dioxide (CO2) during photosynthesis and end up releasing the majority of it as an unnecessary byproduct, saving a small portion for future energy.

 

Nitrogen deficiency

Nitrogen deficiency

Nitrogen (N) is essential for plant growth and is part of every living cell. It plays many roles in plants and is necessary for chlorophyll synthesis. Plants take up most of their N as the ammonium (NH4+) or nitrate (No3-) ion. Some direct absorption of urea can occur through the leaves, and small amounts of N are obtained from materials such as water-soluble amino acids.

Nitrogen (N) surrounds all plants in our atmosphere. In fact, every acre of the Earth’s surface is covered by thousands of pounds of this essential nutrient, but because atmospheric gaseous N presents itself as almost inert nitrogen (N2) molecules, this N isn’t directly available to the plants that need it to grow, develop and reproduce.Despite its identity as one of the most abundant elements on Earth, deficient N is probably the most common nutritional problem affecting plants worldwide.

Healthy plants often contain 3 to 4 percent N in their above-ground tissues. These are much higher concentrations than those of any other nutrient except carbon, hydrogen and oxygen – nutrients not of soil fertility management concern in most situations. Nitrogen is an important component of many important structural, genetic and metabolic compounds in plant cells. It’s a major element in chlorophyll, the compound by which plants use sunlight energy to produce sugars from water and carbon dioxide, or, in other words, photosynthesis.

Nitrogen is also a major component of amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Some proteins act as structural units in plant cells, while others act as enzymes, making possible many of the biochemical reactions on which life is based. Nitrogen appears in energy-transfer compounds, such as ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which allows cells to conserve and use the energy released in metabolism. Finally, N is a significant component of nucleic acids such as DNA, the genetic material that allows cells (and eventually whole plants) to grow and reproduce. With the exception of photosynthesis, N plays the same roles in animals, too. Without N, there would be no life as we know it.

Adequate N produces a dark green color in the leaves, caused by high concentration of chlorophyll. Nitrogen deficiency results in chlorosis (a yellowing) of the leaves because of the declining chlorophyll. This yellowing starts first on oldest leaves, then develops on younger ones as the deficiency becomes more severe. Slow growth and stunted plants are also indicators of N deficiency. Small grains and other grass-type plants tiller less when N is in short supply.

Symptoms of deficiency can vary across crop species, but similarities exist for how nutrient insufficiency impacts plant tissue color and appearance. Nutrient deficiencies are commonly associated with the physical location on the plant
(i.e., whether the symptoms are primarily observed on older versus newly formed plant tissue), but these symptoms can spread as the severity of the deficiency progresses.

Molybdenum deficiency

Molybdenum deficiency

Molybdenum (Mo) is a trace element found in the soil and is required for the synthesis and activity of the enzyme nitrate reductase. Molybdenum is vital for the process of symbiotic nitrogen (N) fixation by Rhizobia bacteria in legume root modules. Considering Mo’s importance in optimizing plant growth, it’s fortunate that Mo deficiencies are relatively rare in most agricultural cropping areas.

Plants take up molybdenum (Mo) as the MoO42- anion. It’s required for the synthesis and activity of the enzyme nitrate reductase and. vital for the process of symbiotic nitrogen (N) fixation by Rhizobia bacteria in root nodules. It’s also needed to convert inorganic phosphorus (P) to organic forms in the plant.

Molybdenum deficiencies show up as general yellowing or stunting of the plant, and more specifically in the marginal scorching and cupping or rolling of leaves. An Mo deficiency can also cause N-deficiency symptoms in legume crops such as soybeans and alfalfa, because soil bacteria growing symbiotically in legume root nodules must have Mo to help fix N from the air.

Molybdenum deficiencies occur mainly in acidic, sandy soils in humid regions. Sandy soils, in particular, more typically lack Mo than finer-textured soils. Molybdenum becomes more available as soil pH goes up, the opposite of other micronutrients. Since Mo becomes more available with increasing pH, liming will correct a deficiency if soil contains enough of the nutrient. However, seed treatment is the most common way of correcting Mo deficiency because only very small amounts of the nutrient are required.

Heavy P applications increase Mo uptake by plants, while heavy sulfur (S) applications decrease Mo uptake. Applying heavy amounts of S-containing fertilizer on soils with a borderline Mo level may induce Mo deficiency.

Excessive Mo is toxic, especially to grazing animals. Cattle eating forage with excessive Mo content may develop severe diarrhea.

 

 

Symptoms of deficiency can vary across crop species, but similarities exist for how nutrient insufficiency impacts plant tissue color and appearance. Nutrient deficiencies are commonly associated with the physical location on the plant

(i.e., whether the symptoms are primarily observed on older versus newly formed plant tissue), but these symptoms can spread as the severity of the deficiency progresses.

Iron deficiency

Iron deficiency

Iron (Fe) is essential for crop growth and food production. Plants take up Fe as the ferrous (Fe2+) cation. Iron is a component of many enzymes associated with energy transfer, nitrogen reduction and fixation, and lignin formation.

Iron (Fe) is involved in the production of chlorophyll, and Fe chlorosis is easily recognized on Fe-sensitive crops growing on calcareous soils. Iron also composes many enzymes associated with energy transfer, nitrogen reduction and fixation, and lignin formation. Iron is associated with sulfur in plants to form compounds that catalyze other reactions.

Iron deficiencies are mainly manifested in yellowed leaves that result from low levels of chlorophyll. Leaf yellowing first appears on the younger, upper leaves in interveinal tissues. Severe Fe deficiencies cause leaves to turn completely yellow or almost white, and then brown as leaves die.

Iron deficiencies occur mainly in calcareous (high pH) soils, although some acidic, sandy soils low in organic matter also may be Fe-deficient. Cool, wet weather enhances Fe deficiencies, especially on soils with marginal levels of available Fe. Poorly aerated or highly compacted land also reduces Fe uptake by plants. Uptake of Fe decreases with increased soil pH, and is adversely affected by high levels of available phosphorus, manganese and zinc in the ground.

Since soil applications of most Fe sources are generally ineffective for correcting Fe deficiencies in crops, foliar sprays are the recommended method. The application rate should be high enough to wet the foliage, so spraying a 3 to 4 percent FeSO4 solution at 20 to 40 gallons per acre is typical. Including a sticker-spreader agent in the spray helps improve its adherence to the plant foliage for increased Fe absorption by the plant. Even so, correcting chlorosis may require more than one foliar Fe application.

 

 

Symptoms of deficiency can vary across crop species, but similarities exist for how nutrient insufficiency impacts plant tissue color and appearance. Nutrient deficiencies are commonly associated with the physical location on the plant
(i.e., whether the symptoms are primarily observed on older versus newly formed plant tissue), but these symptoms can spread as the severity of the deficiency progresses.